1920c, East Bay, Mills College: El Campanil (bell tower)
Trenor St. and Seminary Ave., Oakland
Julia Morgan

  No comment (Boutelle 1988: 249; Gebhard, Winter and Sandweiss 1985: 308).

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1904, East Bay, Annie Caroline Edmonds Apts.
2612-16 Regent Street, Berkeley
Julia Morgan

  Morgan's first commission after her certification in 1904 was for an apartment house in Berkeley for Annie Caroline Edmonds, an 1882 Berkeley graduate who taught mathematics and German in the local high school. The redwood-shingle structure with side entrance is subtle and sophisticated for such an early work, clearly demonstrating that Morgan knew what she was about. The apartment building remains intact, with no significant changes (Boutelle 1988: 129, 249; Gebhard, Winter and Sandweiss 1985: 308).

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1905, North Bay, North Star Mine house
Grass Valley
Julia Morgan

  One of Morgan's first significant domestic commissions in the [Arts and Crafts] style was a house built in 1905 for Arthur De Wint Foote, manager of the North Star Mine in the gold country near Grass Valley. The site selected, a knoll in a wooded area just above a flowing stream, provided a setting of great beauty and an appropriately commanding position for a house that was to cover 18,000 square feet and cost $23,000. Foote's diary of the period notes when Morgan first came up to walk over the site and mentions her visits during construction, but he says nothing about how he chose the architect or the extent to which he and his wife, painter-illustrator and author Mary Hallock Foote, were involved in building the house. The nearby Empire Mine had a house designed by Willis Polk about ten years before, which indicates that at least some landowners in the area were cognizant of Bay Area architecture.

The Foote house creates a massive first impression: rough-cut quarry rock (containing a high proportion of quartz) forms the first floor and veranda; heavy columns are surmounted by a redwood-shingle second floor beneath a low-pitched roof. The apparent simplicity of these strong, straightforward elements masks a complex relationship to the site. The veranda and protecting stone terrace overlook the stream and the valley below, and because the brick footpath leads to the corner rather than directly to the front, the visitor's first view is one of two sides of a building that seems to have grown among the evergreens. The U-form plan features two sleeping porches, one along the porch in front and the other within the sheltered patio, whose massive stone columns along the sides support a pergola. The wide overhang of the roof in the rear is broken at each side to allow maximum light to the upstairs windows and to provide visual interest. Eyebrow ventilators on the inner sides of the U repeat the shape of the breaks in the roofline, exemplifying Morgan's skillful use of details to reinforce overall form.

The main entrance leads into a hall that serves as reception room; it is paneled in wood, as is the rest of the house. Structural elements provide the major source of interior interest. A clinker-brick fireplace with semicircular opening makes a simple focal point and links the reception room to the sitting room, which features another fireplace from the same chimney. The windows show the variation of size and shape that is characteristic of the Crafts style, as is the continued use of local materials. Built-in features included inglenook seating hinged for wood storage, bookcases, buffets, and (on the second floor) bureaus and broad windowsill seating. Shutters helped mediate the bedrooms' exposure to heat and cold. The Foote house is one of a series in which Morgan worked out ways to integrate geometric forms and simple local materials into a sense of natural wholeness that is as fresh after eighty years as it was during construction (Boutelle 1988: 130-31, 249).

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1905, East Bay, Louise (Mrs. C. L.) Goddard houses
2615, 2617, 2619 Parker St., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

  Three nonidentical speculative houses; see also 1905-07 (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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1905, East Bay, Professor Kofoid house
2616 Etna St., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

  See 1906 (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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1905, East Bay, William Conger Morgan house
2440 Hillside St., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

  No comment (Boutelle 1988: 249).

William Conger Morgan (1874-1940) received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Yale. At Berkeley he served as a member of Professor O'Neill's staff in chemistry until 1913, when he was appointed to the post of professor and chairman of the Department of Chemistry at the new Reed College in Portland, Oregon. In 1919 he was appointed head of the Chemistry Department on the southern campus of the University of California in Los Angeles, where he spent the last nineteen years of his professional career (William Conger Morgan, Chemistry: Berkeley and Los Angeles. University of California: In Memoriam).

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1905, East Bay, Rev. Edward L. and Bertha Parsons house
2732 Durant St., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

Reverend Edward L. and Bertha Parsons house

Moved from 2532 Durant Street and remodeled by Morgan as student residence, 1915 (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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1905, East Bay, Mrs. A. Sedgwich house
2903 N. Dwight Way, Berkeley
Julia Morgan

Mrs. A. Sedgwich house

No comment (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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1905, East Bay, Mrs. A. A. Smith house
2310 College Ave., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

Mrs. A. A. Smith house

No comment (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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1905, East Bay, F. A. Thomas house
883 Arlington St., Berkeley
Julia Morgan

  No comment (Boutelle 1988: 249).

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